Uncategorized

SMALL COLLEGE BASKETBALL HALL OF FAME INAUGURAL CLASS

basketball

Hellen Carpenter is the granddaughter of Dr. James Naismith, the man who invented basketball. On Thursday, June 30, 2016,  Small College Basketball announces the inaugural Hall of Fame Class inductees, which naturally includes Dr. Naismith. The actual induction ceremony will be held Thursday, November 17, 2016, and Dr. and Mrs. Will Carpenter and other family members will be in attendance at the event. (Press release for the event below)

SCB Announces Inaugural Hall of Fame Induction Class

BALDWIN CITY, Kan. – It is with great enthusiasm and excitement that Small College Basketball announces the inaugural Hall of Fame Class of inductees into the Small College Basketball Hall of Fame.

The 2016 Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony will be held on Thursday, Nov. 17 at the Ford Center in Evansville, Indiana. Fans may purchase tickets/tables to the Hall of Fame Induction through the following link, www.HoFClassic.com, or by calling 812-421-2212.

“It is an absolute thrill to announce the inaugural class for the Small College Basketball Hall of Fame,” said Hall of Fame and SCB Founder John McCarthy. “This class represents the best of the best in the history of small college basketball, and it is with great pleasure that we announce this class.”

Players

Dr. Dick Barnett (Tennessee A&I)

Bevo Francis (Rio Grande)

John Ebeling (Florida Southern)

Travis Grant (Kentucky State)

Bob Hopkins (Grambling)

Lucious Jackson (Pan American College)

Phil Jackson (North Dakota)

Earl Monroe (Winston-Salem State)

Willis Reed (Grambling)

John Rinka (Kenyon)

Jerry Sloan (Evansville)

Coaches

Clarence Gaines (Winston-Salem State)

Arad McCutchan (Evansville)

John McLendon (North Carolina College, Hampton, Tennessee A&I, Kentucky State & Cleveland State)

 

(Please see the Small College Basketball website at www.smallcollegebasketball.com {Hall of Fame tab} to view short bios and photos of each Hall of Fame inductee).

“It is important to note the tremendous amount of time and effort put forth from our Hall of Fame Committee,” said McCarthy. “This process has taken months and months of research, discussion and exchange of information. Through this committee, we established the criteria, the process and the timeline, and that was before we began the actual selection of this Hall of Fame class. This prominent committee spent a great deal of time with this process, and I am incredibly grateful.”

The SCB Hall of Fame committee consists of: Don Landry, former head coach/AD/commissioner, Roy Pickerill, SID Kentucky Wesleyan and NCAA Elite 8 media coordinator, Pat Coleman, owner of D3hoops.com, Doug Palm, NCAA DIII historian, Rick Zvosec, former collegiate head coach, Gary Pine, Azusa Pacific AD, Steve Shepherd, AD and head basketball coach at College of the Ozarks, Gary Stewart, head coach at Stevenson University, Jerry Dunn, head coach at Tuskegee, Matt Simms, executive director of USCAA, Mike Lightfoot, head coach at Bethel (Ind.), Mike Hall, commissioner of Southern States Athletic Conference and former chair of NCAA DII national basketball committee and Bob Guptil, former SID at Great Northwest Athletic Conference.

“This inaugural class can be best described as The Dream Team of Small College Basketball, “ stated Roy Pickerill, Hall of Fame Committee member and longtime Sports Information Director at Kentucky Wesleyan College. “These are the legends from the 50’s, 60’s and 70’s who made an indelible mark at their schools as national renowned collegiate players and coaches.”

In terms of criteria for selection into the Small College Basketball Hall of Fame, the committee used the following basic guidelines:

 

  • Must have played, coached or contributed at the small college level (four-year, non-NCAA Division I)
  • Focus is on accomplishments/contributions specifically at the collegiate level
  • Players must be a minimum of five years removed from their final year of their collegiate career. Coaches must be a minimum of three years removed from their last season of their coaching career. There is no such timetable for contributors.
  • The Inaugural Class will consist of 15 members. Subsequent classes will consist of 8-12 members.
  • Each Class will have a minimum of one inductee from each of three categories: Player, Coach and Contributor.
  • All players, coaches and contributors that have not been inducted into the Small College Basketball Hall of Fame will continue to be eligible for annual consideration, as long as they meet the above guidelines. There is no timetable whereby candidates rotate off/out of consideration.

“This class is an amazing representation and example of the rich tradition of small college basketball,” said Hall of Fame Committee member Mike Lightfoot, who is the legendary coach at Bethel (IN). “Congrats to these deserving individuals!”

Through the creation of the Hall of Fame, Small College Basketball seeks to bring great attention to the game of basketball at the small college levels.

“Through the years, there have been so many great players, coaches and contributors that have been involved in our game at the small college level,” said McCarthy. “Through the creation of the SCB Hall of Fame, we will pay tribute to them, and recognize their accomplishments on a national scale.”

If you are interested in nominating a former SCB collegiate student-athlete, coach or contributor for the Hall of Fame, please submit information to scbhof@gmail.com.

For more information about Small College Basketball, please visit the website at www.smallcollegebasketball.com.

For a look at a short bio of each hall of fame recipient, please see below.

Players

 Dick Barnett, Tennessee A&I

2007 College Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; 2012 NAIA 75th Anniversary All-Star Team honoree; Three-time NAIA All-American 1957, 1958, 1959; Three-time Associated Press Little College All-American 1957, 1958, 1959; Two-time United Press International Small College All-American 1958, 1959; Won three consecutive NAIA Championships 1957, 1958, 1959; Two-time NAIA Championship Most Valuable Player 1958, 1959; NCAA’s 12th all-time leading 3,209 points for a 23.6 average in 136 games; Collected 1,571 career rebounds for a 11.6 average; Career shooting 44.8 percent from the field and 80.0 from the free throw line. Member of the NAIA’s 50th & 75th Anniversary Teams; NAIA Hall of Fame

John Ebeling, Florida Southern

He was the NABC National Player of the Year in 1982. He was a first team All-American in 1981 and 1982 and a 3rd team All-American in 1980. He was the National Championship’s Most Outstanding Player in 1981. He was selected on the All-Tournament team in 1980, 1981 and 1982, the only player ever honored in three consecutive years. He led Florida Southern to the national title in 1981, second in 1982 and third in 1980. He scored 2,514 career points in 127 games for a 19.8 career average while shooting 60.8 % from the field and 71.6 from the free throw line for his career. He had 1,362 career rebounds (8th most in NCAA Division II history), for a 10.7 average.  In 1982, he led Division II in scoring with a 26.8 average and was second in rebounding with a 12.8 average. He was named to the NCAA Division II 50th Anniversary team in 2006.

Bevo Francis, Rio Grande

Scored 116 in one game in his freshman season (1952-53) and 113 in a game during his sophomore season (1953-54). Scored 1,954 points his freshman season for an average of 50.1 ppg and led the team to a 39-0 record. Scored 1,319 points in his sophomore season for an average of 47.1 ppg to lead his team to a record of 21-7, with many victories over major college programs (Wake Forest, Miami, Arizona State, Creighton, Providence, and more). Scored 3,273 points, and shot 68% on field goals, in his two-year collegiate career. Became the most popular player in the world during this period, and is credited with saving his school from bankruptcy. The new award for the player with the finest season within Small College Basketball is now named after Bevo Francis (the Bevo Francis Award).

Travis Grant, Kentucky State

2009 College Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; 2012 NAIA 75th Anniversary Team honoree; College Basketball Player of the Year (1972); Three-time NAIA All-American 1970, 1971, 1972; Three-time Associated Press Little College All-American 1970, 1971, 1972; Three-time United Press International Small College All-American 1970, 1971, 1972; Three-time NABC Division II All-American 1970, 1971, 1972; Won three NAIA Championships 1970, 1971, 1972; Two-time NAIA Championship Most Valuable Player 1971, 1972; NCAA’s All-Time Leading Scorer 4,045 points for an NCAA third-best 33.4 average in 121 games; Scored a single game career-high 75 points; Collected 1,121 rebounds for a 9.4 average; Career shooting 64.0 percent from the field and 77.4 from the free throw line; Still holds NAIA Tournament records for points in a game, points in a tournament, points in a career, field goals in a game, field goals in a tournament and field goals in a career

Bob Hopkins, Grambling State

Grambling State (1952-56) was a three-time All-American and a four-time All-Midwest Conference selection.  He finished his career as the most prolific scorer in small college basketball history. At the end of his career, he held these NCAA and NAIA career records: most points scored (3,759), Highest scoring average (29.8), most field goals attempted (3,309), most field goals made (1,400); most free throws attempted (1,292), most free throws made (953), and most rebounds (2,191).  He averaged 17.4 rebounds for his career.  He averaged 30.9 points in 1956 (2nd in nation); 32.4 ppg in 1955 (3rd in nation), 27.8 ppg in 1954 (9th in nation); and 28.5 ppg in 1953 (4th in nation).

Lucious Jackson, Pan American College

NAIA Hall of Fame; Named to All Time NAIA Team (1952-70), and NAIA’s 50th & 75th Anniversary Teams; NAIA Tournament MVP in 1963 & 1964; NAIA National Champions in 1963 & Runner Up in 1964; Led NAIA Tournament in rebounding in 1963 & 1964; played one season at Texas Southern, averaging 17.2 ppg and 17.1 rpg. As a sophomore at Pan American, Jackson averaged 20.9 ppg and 16.6 rpg, while shooting 52.8%fg. As a junior, he averaged 24.8 ppg and 19.5 rpg, while shooting 53%fg. As a senior, Jackson averged 24.6 ppg and 18.8 rpg, while shooting 56.4%fg.

Phil Jackson, North Dakota

Two-time Associated Press Little College All-American 1966, 1967; Two-time United Press International Small College All-American 1966, 1967; Chosen to NCAA Elite Eight 50th Anniversary Team; 1966 NCAA College Division Championship All-Tournament Team; Starter on two NCAA College Division Championship Semifinal Teams 1965, 1966; Averaged a double-double all three seasons; Scored 1,708 career points for a 19.9 average in 86 games; Grabbed 1,109 career rebounds for a 12.9 average; Career shooting 51.0 percent from the field and 73.8 from the free throw line

Earl Monroe, Winston-Salem State

2006 College Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; NCAA’s Division II 14th Leading Scorer 2,935 points, 669 rebounds; 1967 NCAA College Division Championship Most Outstanding Player; 1967 NCAA College Division Champion; Chosen to NCAA Elite Eight 50th Anniversary Team; Scored 2,935 career points for a 26.7 average in 110 games; Averaged 29.8 points as a junior and 41.5 (1,329) as a senior; Scored over 50 points nine times including a career-high 68; Collected 669 rebounds for a 6.0 average; Career shooting 59.0 percent from the field and 81.8 from the free throw line

Willis Reed, Grambling State

He was a two-time consensus first-team All-American.  He finished his career with 2,280 points for an 18.7 average and 1,851 rebounds for a 15.2 average.  He participated in three NAIA tournaments, leading Grambling to the 1961 national championship and to a third place finish in 1963.  Three-time NAIA Champion All-Tournament Team 1960, 1961, 1963. Two-time NAIA All-American 1963, 1964. He averaged 26.6 points and 21.3 rebounds (2nd in nation) in 1964; 21.2 points and 17.1 rebounds in 1963 and 17.6 points and 14.6 rebounds in 1962. He played on the USA team that won the gold medal in the Pan-American games.  He is a member of the Naismith Hall of Fame and the NAIA Hall of Fame.  2006 College Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; 1970 NAIA Hall of Fame inductee; 2012 NAIA 50th & 75th Anniversary Teams; Scored 2,280 career points for a 19.5 average; Grabbed 1,786 career rebounds for a 15.3 average; Averaged 26.6 points per game and 21.3 rebounds per game as a senior; Career shooting 58.7 percent from the field and 75.7 percent from the free throw line.

John Rinka, Kenyon

Three-time Associated Press Little College All-American 1968, 1969, 1970; Three-time United Press International Small College American 1986, 1969, 1970; Three-time NABC All-American 1968, 1969, 1970; First non–Division I recipient of the 1970 Frances Pomeroy Naismith Award, which is given to the top men’s college basketball player under 6-feet tall; Scored 69 points in a game, which is tied for the 21st-highest performance in NCAA history; Averaged 41.0 points during 1969-70 season, the eighth highest in NCAA history; Scored 3,251 career points, also the ninth highest in NCAA history, for a 32.8 average, also sixth- best in NCAA history, in 99 games; Career shooting 48.8 percent from the field and 86.8 from the free throw line

Jerry Sloan, Evansville

Three-time United Press International Small College All-American 1963, 1964, 1965; Two-time Associated Press Little College All-American 1964, 1965; Won 1964, 1965 NCAA College Division Championship; Two-time NCAA Championship Most Outstanding Player 1964, 1965; Chosen to NCAA Elite Eight 50th Anniversary Team; Holds NCAA Championship game rebounding record (25); Scored 1,320 career points for a 15.7 average; Grabbed 1,053 career rebounds for a 12.4 average; Career shooting 40.2 percent from the field and 72.1 from the free throw line

Coaches

 Clarence Gaines, Winston-Salem State

1982 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; College Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; 1975 NAIA Helms Hall of Fame inductee; 1967 NCAA College Division Coach of the Year; 1967 NCAA College Division Championship (30-2), the first historically Black college to win a national championship; Compiled a 828-447 record for a 64.9 winning percentage in 47 seasons; Eighteen 20-win seasons and eight CIAA titles; Chosen to NCAA Elite Eight 50th Anniversary Team. Gaines coached basketball at Winston-Salem State University (WSSU) from 1946 to 1993, compiling an 828-447 record.

Arad McCutchan, Evansville

First small college coach inducted into Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame 1981; 1981 College Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; Two-time NCAA College Division Coach of the Year 1964, 1965; Won a record five NCAA College Division Championships 1959, 1960, 1964, 1965, 1971; Led Evansville to a perfect season in 1965, 29-0; NCAA College Division Third Place finish 1958; Twice went to the NCAA College Division Quarterfinals 1963, 1968; Coached the 1960 and 1968 United States Olympic Trials teams; Compiled a 515-313 record for a 62.1 winning percentage in 31 seasons; Twelve 20-win seasons, 15 NCAA Tournament Appearances, 10 Regional Championships; Chosen to NCAA Elite Eight 50th Anniversary Team

 John McLendon, Tennessee A&I, North Carolina College, Kentucky State, Hampton Institute, Cleveland State

1979 Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; 2007 College Basketball Hall of Fame inductee; 2012 NAIA 75th Anniversary All-Star Team honoree; First college coach ever to win three consecutive national championships (Three NAIA Championships 1957, 1958, 1959); 1960 NAIA Semifinalist; 1958 NAIA Coach of the Year; Compiled a 496-179 record for a 73.5 winning percentage in 25 seasons at Tennessee State, Kentucky State, North Carolina Central, Hampton and Cleveland State (all Div. II or NAIA). In his early years, his teams were restricted to playing only against other all-black teams. However, while coaching at North Carolina College, McLendon participated in “The Secret Game”, a match against a team from Duke University, which was the first collegiate basketball contest where blacks and whites competed on the same floor. He led the Eagles to eight CIAA Championships (1941, 1943–44, 1946–47, 1949–50, 1952). At Cleveland State, he was he first African American head coach of a predominantly white university. McLendon’s contributions to the game of basketball include the invention of the full-court press and four corners offense.

Contributor

Dr. James Naismith

The father of basketball, James Naismith helped stage and lent his name to the first National College Basketball tournament (NAIB) at Municipal Auditorium in Kansas City in 1937. The first NAIB tournament (now NAIA) was held one year prior to the first NIT tournament in 1938 and two years prior to the inaugural NCAA tournament in 1939. . . In his will, he left that the Maude Naismith Trophy (named for his first wife) be presented to the National Champion each year (which is still presented to the NAIA Division I National Champion to this day). Naismith was a physical education instructor at Springfield College between 1890 and 1895 where he invented an indoor game that could be played between football and baseball. He developed basketball’s original 13 rules and through the YMCA network, quickly spread the news throughout the country. As the popularity of the sport grew, Naismith neither sought publicity nor engaged in self-promotion. Naismith spent three years at the YMCA in Denver, Colo., (1895-98) before spending the remainder of his career at the University of Kansas as the head coach (1898-1907), athletic director (1919-37) and professor (1909-13) except from 1914 to 1919 when he served in the military. In 10 seasons, he compiled a record of 55-60…Since his death in 1939, Naismith has been selected to 10 different Hall-of-Fames, including six in his native country of Canada. Promoted basketball to be adopted as an Olympic demonstration sport in 1904 and was among those that successfully led the movement that saw the sport gain official sport status at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, Germany. In 1936, when basketball made its debut in the Olympics, the NABC collected money so that the 74-year-old Naismith could witness the historic event. During the Olympics, he was named the honorary president of the International Basketball Federation.

#SCB

A book about Dr. Naismith, The Man Who Invented Basketball, can be found on www.amazon.com

Naismith booki

 

 

Basketball goal image is licensed under CC By 4.0 — linked to  www.pexels.com

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s